Tag Archives: road diet

A Reduced Residential Speed Limit Is A Good Idea, And It’s Not About Us Versus Them

With the Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues proposing to reduce the speed limit on residential roads from the current 50 km/hr to 40 km/hr, speed limits are, not surprisingly, back in the news in this city. In the last couple of days David Staples has written about the proposed change and the Edmonton Journal has published an editorial on the subject as well. This comes on the heels of a local doctor bringing the issue to residents’ attention by saying that the city is not taking pedestrian safety seriously. Me being me, and loving Twitter more than is probably healthy, I’ve waded into the discussion on that platform on two occasions (you can find Storify records of my thoughts here and here), but it being a complex subject I thought that discussing the subject in more than 140 characters might not be a bad idea.

I’ve written about lower speed limits and the effect that can have on pedestrian safety before, so it’s not surprising that I support the idea of reducing speed limits on residential roads in Edmonton, and throughout Alberta and Canada for that matter. There are roadways where higher speed limits are appropriate but when people and cars start to mix it’s worth considering a change because at 50 km/hr people and cars are a deadly combination. Why then do we have speed limits on our local roads that are so dangerous for everyone but those that are in cars? That’s a good question.

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If I Could Put One Road In Edmonton On A Diet

Edgewater Dr in Orlando, FL - AfterFor me, the best part of walking to work every day is that it gives me time to myself to just think. I use the time to listen to some music – this morning I went with a fantastic Grateful Dead show from October 1976 – and for twenty minutes I’m in my own world. Sometimes I think about work. Far too often I think about the Oilers. Sometimes I think about the drivers in this city and I wonder why they all seem to be so terrible. And other times I think about the street I’m walking beside and how I might improve it.

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